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Following the advice of UK and Scottish Governments, NCAP has now returned to limited operations in our offices.

We are now able to process orders for not-yet-digitised aerial imagery, to revised delivery timescales.

Geography

Aerial photographs may be used to illustrate almost any aspect of geography. They can be used to help answer questions about coasts, population, economic activity, glaciers, development, tourism and climate. The National Collection of Aerial Photography holds complete cover of Scotland from different periods and can offer comparative cover for a wide variety of geographical studies.

 

This Feature presents some example images of different landscapes in Scotland and shows where they can be used to deliver educational experiences and outcomes in the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence.

 

  • broaden my understanding of the world by learning about human activities and achievements in the past and present
  • learn how to locate, explore and link features and places locally and further afield

 

Glen Clova, Angus

The River South Esk meanders through Glen Clova, a glacial u-shaped valley, overlooked by three ice-carved corries to the north. 

 

Experiences and Outcomes: 

 

Describe the major characteristic features of Scotland's landscape and explain how these were formed (SOC 2-07a)

 

Explain the impact of processes which form and shape landscapes on selected landscapes in Scotland, Europe and beyond (SOC 3-07a)

 

Barnharrow, Wigtownshire

This image shows an area of glacial deposition featuring a group of drumlins, cultivated and bounded by drystane walls, and two eskers. The features are aligned north-east to south-west, indicating the direction of ice movement.

 

Experiences and Outcomes:

 

Describe the major characteristic features of Scotland's landscape and explain how these were formed (SOC 2-07a)

 

Explain the impact of processes which form and shape landscapes on selected landscapes in Scotland, Europe and beyond (SOC 3-07a)

 

Culbin, Moray

Culbin Forest anchors an extensive afforested sand dune system while a sand spit evolves offshore.

 

Experiences and Outcomes:

 

Explain the impact of processes which form and shape landscapes on selected landscapes in Scotland, Europe and beyond (SOC 3-07a)

 

Luce Bay, Wigtownshire

The Piltanton Burn meanders across the coastal lowland north of Luce Bay. Several cut-off meanders can be seen along the course of the stream, while dark, curved marks in cultivated fields reveal its former course.

 

Experiences and Outcomes:

 

Explain the impact of processes which form and shape landscapes on selected landscapes in Scotland, Europe and beyond (SOC 3-07a)

 

Queensferry, West Lothian

Queensferry overlooks some of Scotland's main transport links: two bridges over the Forth linking central and southern Scotland by road and rail, and the estuary itself, plied by oil tankers and cargo ships moving between Grangemouth and the North Sea.

 

Experiences and Outcomes:

 

Assess the impact of developments in transport infrastructure in a selected area (SOC 4-09b)

 

Straiton, Midlothian

The brown scar running from west to east across this image is the Edinburgh city bypass, seen under construction in 1988. Built around the southern fringes of the city, this dual carriageway was designed to link the A1 trunk road from the south with motorways to the west and north.

 

Experiences and Outcomes:

 

Assess the impact of developments in transport infrastructure in a selected area (SOC 4-09b)

 

East Kilbride, Lanarkshire, 1946

This image shows the site of East Kilbride, selected in 1947 to become the first of Scotland's five 'New Towns', designed to alleviate a shortage of housing in Glasgow after the Second World War. A wooded stream fringes cultivated fields at the centre of the image; this feature can be traced on the next image, showing the town in 1988.

 

Experiences and Outcomes:

 

Describe and assess the impact of human activity on an area (SOC 4-10a)

 

East Kilbride seen after its construction and expansion. The wooded stream visible in 1946 can be traced at left of centre, running around the edge of an industrial estate. Housing estates have been developed on farmland to the south and east.

 

Experiences and Outcomes:

 

Explain the development of the main features of an urban area in Scotland or elsewhere and evaluate the implication for the society concerned (SOC 4-10b)

 

Ben Cruachan, Argyll 

A pumped-storage hydro electricity generating station is located inside Ben Cruachan; the high dam holding the water source sits in a mountain corrie, while the outfall from the turbine generators can be seen below, at the loch shoreline.

 

Experiences and Outcomes:

 

Discuss the environmental impact of human activity (SOC 2-08a) Discuss the sustainability of key natural resources (SOC 4-08a)

https://canmore.org.uk/collection/1045119
 

A pumped-storage hydro electricity generating station is located inside Ben Cruachan; the high dam holding the water source sits in a mountain corrie, while the outfall from the turbine generators can be seen below, at the loch shoreline.

 

Experiences and Outcomes:

 

Discuss the environmental impact of human activity (SOC 2-08a) Discuss the sustainability of key natural resources (SOC 4-08a)

 

Lammermuir Hills, Berwickshire

The crazy-paving pattern of vegetation seen on the Lammermuir Hills is the result of strip-burning of heather by shooting estates, to provide new plant growth for young grouse to feed on.

 

Experiences and Outcomes:

 

Discuss the environmental impact of human activity (SOC 2-08a) Describe and assess the impact of human activity on an area (SOC 4-10a)

 

Grangemouth, Stirlingshire

One of Scotland's major ports, Grangemouth is located in the upper Forth estuary and is the site of an oil refinery and a non-tidal basin used by large cargo ships.

 

Experiences and Outcomes:

 

Discuss the environmental impact of human activity (SOC 2-08a) Describe and assess the impact of human activity on an area (SOC 4-10a)

 

Creetown, Kirkcudbrightshire

This image illustrates that an important industrial development can have a comparatively minimal impact on the landscape. Creetown quarry supplied granite blocks for the construction of Liverpool docks and the paving of streets in many Lancashire towns during the late 19th-century. Its main environmental feature is its spoil tip, arranged to counteract the silting up of the River Cree and to provide a jetty at which large ships could dock at low-tide.

 

Experiences and Outcomes:

 

Discuss the environmental impact of human activity (SOC 2-08a) Describe and assess the impact of human activity on an area (SOC 4-10a)

 

Glasgow, Lanarkshire, 1947

Once the centre of Scottish shipbuilding, the number of ships built in Glasgow and the Clyde has declined sharply since the Second World War and today only two yards survive.

 

Experiences and Outcomes:

 

Explain the development of an economic activity and assess the impact of change within its locality and beyond (SOC 4-10c) Evaluate the changes which have taken place in an industry in Scotland's past and debate their impact (SOC 4-05b)

 

 

Curriculum for Excellence: aerial photography can help to deliver the following Social Studies experiences and outcomes

 

  • use knowledge of a historical period to interpret the evidence and present an informed view (SOC 3-01a)
  • evaluate the changes which have taken place in an industry and debate their impact (SOC 4-05b)
  • describe the major characteristic features of Scotland's landscape and explain how these were formed (SOC 2-07a)
  • explain the impact of processes which form and shape landscapes on selected landscapes in Scotland, Europe and beyond (SOC 3-07a)
  • discuss the environmental impact of human activity (SOC 2-08a) discuss the sustainability of key natural resources (SOC 4-08a)
  • assess the impact of developments in transport infrastructure in a selected area (SOC 4-09b)
  • describe and assess the impact of human activity on an area (SOC 4-10a)
  • explain the development of the main features of an urban area and evaluate the implications for the society involved (SOC 4-10b)
  • explain how the physical environment influences the ways in which people use land by comparing the local area with a contrasting area (SOC 2-13a)
  • compare settlement and economic activity in two contrasting landscapes (SOC 3-13a)